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Chico / Oroville (530) 343-1666

Monday, 10 December 2018 00:00

Even though many women enjoy wearing high heels and admire how the foot looks in high heeled shoes, there may be specific foot issues that may develop as a result of wearing this type of shoe. The ankles may become unstable, which may affect the body’s balance, in addition to providing inadequate support while walking. Research has shown that muscles may gradually reduce in length in the back of the leg and they may get longer in the front of the leg. These changes may affect the muscle strength in the leg and may influence overall body stability. If you choose to wear high heels, there may be techniques that can be implemented, which may minimize any injuries that may occur. These may include performing gentle stretching exercises, using resistance bands that may aid in strengthening the leg muscles, and using your toes to pick up small objects, which may help the muscles in the toes to become stronger. If you have questions about the effects high heels can have on your feet, it is suggested to speak with a podiatrist.

High heels have a history of causing foot and ankle problems. If you have any concerns about your feet or ankles, contact Dr. Thong V. Truong from California. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Effects of High Heels on the Feet

High heels are popular shoes among women because of their many styles and societal appeal.  Despite this, high heels can still cause many health problems if worn too frequently.

Which parts of my body will be affected by high heels?

  • Ankle Joints
  • Achilles Tendon – May shorten and stiffen with prolonged wear
  • Balls of the Feet
  • Knees – Heels cause the knees to bend constantly, creating stress on them
  • Back – They decrease the spine’s ability to absorb shock, which may lead to back pain.  The vertebrae of the lower back may compress.

What kinds of foot problems can develop from wearing high heels?

  • Corns
  • Calluses
  • Hammertoe
  • Bunions
  • Morton’s Neuroma
  • Plantar Fasciitis

How can I still wear high heels and maintain foot health?

If you want to wear high heeled shoes, make sure that you are not wearing them every day, as this will help prevent long term physical problems.  Try wearing thicker heels as opposed to stilettos to distribute weight more evenly across the feet.  Always make sure you are wearing the proper shoes for the right occasion, such as sneakers for exercising.  If you walk to work, try carrying your heels with you and changing into them once you arrive at work.  Adding inserts to your heels can help cushion your feet and absorb shock. Full foot inserts or metatarsal pads are available. 

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Chico, and Oroville, CA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Monday, 03 December 2018 00:00

When the sugar levels in the blood become elevated, the medical condition that is known as diabetes may occur. The feet may become affected as a result of this, and proper care must be given, which may avoid uncomfortable and painful foot ailments. These may include diabetic neuropathy, which may make it difficult to feel any wounds or cuts that may be present, or peripheral vascular disease, which may limit blood flow to the feet. Research has shown that foot conditions that are associated with diabetes will benefit from effective treatment methods when implemented. These may include properly taking care of wounds or infections that may have developed, in addition to possibly wearing a boot, which may relieve pressure off the foot. If you are a diabetic patient, it is suggested that you consult with a podiatrist as quickly as possible who can properly monitor this condition, which may affect the feet.

Diabetic foot care is important in preventing foot ailments such as ulcers. If you are suffering from diabetes or have any other concerns about your feet, contact Dr. Thong V. Truong from California. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Diabetic Foot Care

Diabetes affects millions of people every year. The condition can damage blood vessels in many parts of the body, especially the feet. Because of this, taking care of your feet is essential if you have diabetes, and having a podiatrist help monitor your foot health is highly recommended.

The Importance of Caring for Your Feet

  • Routinely inspect your feet for bruises or sores.
  • Wear socks that fit your feet comfortably.
  • Wear comfortable shoes that provide adequate support.

Patients with diabetes should have their doctor monitor their blood levels, as blood sugar levels play such a huge role in diabetic care. Monitoring these levels on a regular basis is highly advised.

It is always best to inform your healthcare professional of any concerns you may have regarding your feet, especially for diabetic patients. Early treatment and routine foot examinations are keys to maintaining proper health, especially because severe complications can arise if proper treatment is not applied.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Chico, and Oroville, CA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Diabetic Foot Conditions
Monday, 26 November 2018 00:00

If you have a bunion, you may be experiencing uncomfortable foot conditions that may develop as a result of this ailment. The bony area that forms on the side of the big toe may lead to inflamed and callused skin, which may make walking difficult to accomplish, depending on the severity of the bunion. Research has shown the formation of bunions may be caused by genetic traits, in addition to medical conditions that may be present, which may include cerebral palsy or rheumatoid arthritis. Additionally, if you choose to wear shoes that are too tight, a bunion may gradually form, and proper treatment should begin as soon as possible. Bunions may be prevented by wearing shoes that fit correctly, leaving ample room for the toes to freely move about in. If you feel you have developed a bunion, it is suggested to speak with a podiatrist to learn about proper treatment techniques.

If you are suffering from bunion pain, contact Dr. Thong V. Truong of California. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What is a Bunion?

Bunions are painful bony bumps that usually develop on the inside of the foot at the joint of the big toe. As the deformity increases over time, it may become painful to walk and wear shoes. Women are more likely to exacerbate existing bunions since they often wear tight, narrow shoes that shift their toes together. Bunion pain can be relieved by wearing wider shoes with enough room for the toes.

Causes

  • Genetics – some people inherit feet that are more prone to bunion development
  • Inflammatory Conditions - rheumatoid arthritis and polio may cause bunion development

Symptoms

  • Redness and inflammation
  • Pain and tenderness
  • Callus or corns on the bump
  • Restricted motion in the big toe

In order to diagnose your bunion, your podiatrist may ask about your medical history, symptoms, and general health. Your doctor might also order an x-ray to take a closer look at your feet. Nonsurgical treatment options include orthotics, padding, icing, changes in footwear, and medication. If nonsurgical treatments don’t alleviate your bunion pain, surgery may be necessary.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Chico, and Oroville, CA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Monday, 19 November 2018 00:00

Morton’s neuroma is the medical term described as an uncomfortable foot condition that is typically located on the bottom of the foot under the third and fourth toes. If the nerve that lies there becomes irritated and swollen, you may experience symptoms that include a tingling or burning sensation, or pain inside the ball of the foot. These symptoms may develop over time and this may depend on what type of shoes are worn or the activities that are performed. Common causes for this condition to develop may come from shoes that do not have adequate room for the toes to move about in, or shoes that exert excess pressure on the ball of the foot. It’s suggested to consult with a podiatrist if you feel you have developed this ailment to discuss proper treatment options.

Morton’s neuroma is a very uncomfortable condition to live with. If you think you have Morton’s neuroma, contact Dr. Thong V. Truong of California. Our doctor will attend to all of your foot and ankle needs and answer any of your related questions.  

Morton’s Neuroma

Morton's neuroma is a painful foot condition that commonly affects the areas between the second and third or third and fourth toe, although other areas of the foot are also susceptible. Morton’s neuroma is caused by an inflamed nerve in the foot that is being squeezed and aggravated by surrounding bones.

What Increases the Chances of having Morton’s Neuroma?

  • Ill-fitting high heels or shoes that add pressure to the toe or foot
  • Jogging, running or any sport that involves constant impact to the foot
  • Flat feet, bunions, and any other foot deformities

Morton’s neuroma is a very treatable condition. Orthotics and shoe inserts can often be used to alleviate the pain on the forefront of the feet. In more severe cases, corticosteroids can also be prescribed. In order to figure out the best treatment for your neuroma, it’s recommended to seek the care of a podiatrist who can diagnose your condition and provide different treatment options.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Chico, and Oroville, CA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Morton's Neuroma
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